Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences Webinar

Chemical Probes for Imaging of Enzyme Targets in Cancer and Infectious Disease
Wednesday, 27 January 2021 - 11:30 am
Location
Contact information
Contact person: 
Eva Hemmer
Email: 
ehemmer@uOttawa.ca
Registration
Registration required: 
Yes
Registration details: 

Please contact Dr. Eva Hemmer to obtain the link to the webinar.

Cost to attend: 
Free of charge
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Abstract: Hydrolases are enzymes (i.e. proteases, esterases, lipases) that often play pathogenic roles in many common human diseases such as cancer, asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and infection by pathogens. Therefore, tools that allow dynamic monitoring of their activity can be used as diagnostic agents, as imaging contrast agents and for the identification of novel enzymes as drug leads. In this presentation, I will describe our efforts to design and build small molecule probes that can be used to identify, inhibit and image various hydrolase targets in models of cancer and infectious disease. This will include recent advances in protease activated fluorescent probes for real-time visualization of tumors during surgery as well our efforts to identify several new classes of serine hydrolases in pathogenic and commensal bacteria. We believe many of these enzymes will represent valuable imaging and therapy targets that can be used to visualize and disrupt various aspects of colonization and community formation inside a host.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Matthew Bogyo is a Professor of Pathology and Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University. He received his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Bates College in 1993 and a doctorate in Chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997. Dr. Bogyo established an independent scientific career as a Faculty Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, where he supervised a small laboratory of post-doctoral fellows and students. In 2001, Dr. Bogyo was hired to establish and direct the Chemical Proteomics Department at Celera Genomics focused on applying small molecule probes to the field of drug discovery. Dr. Bogyo then joined the Department of Pathology at Stanford University in July 2003 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2009 and to full professor in 2013. His laboratory works on the development of new chemical probe technologies that are applied to the study the role of proteases in complex biological pathways associated with human disease. Dr. Bogyo has published over 250 primary research publications and currently serves on the Editorial Board of several prominent research journals.