Book launch: The Movements of Movements 1 and 2

New book collection on social movements
Tuesday, 25 September 2018 - 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
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Our world today is not only a world in crisis but also a world in profound movement, with increasing numbers of people joining or forming movements: local, national, transnational, and global. The dazzling diversity of ideas and experiences recorded in this collection captures something of the fluidity within campaigns for a more equitable planet. This book, taking internationalism seriously without tired dogmas, provides a bracing window into some of the central ideas to have emerged from within grassroots struggles from 2006 to 2010. The essays here cross borders to look at the politics of caste, class, gender, religion, and indigeneity, and move from the local to the global.

What Makes Us Move?, the first of two volumes, provides a background and foundation for understanding the extraordinary range of uprisings around the world: Tahrir Square in Egypt, Occupy in North America, the indignados in Spain, Gezi Park in Turkey, and many others. It draws on the rich reflection that took place following the huge wave of creative direct actions that had preceded it, from the 1990s through to the early 2000s, including the Zapatistas in Mexico, the Battle of Seattle in the United States, and the accompanying formations such as Peoples’ Global Action and the World Social Forum.

Rethinking Our Dance, the second of two volumes, offers a wide range of essays from frontline activists in Afghanistan, Argentina, Brazil, Niger, and Taiwan, as well as from Europe and North America that address the question, “What do we need to do in order to bring about justice and peace?” The Movements of Movements aim to make the bewildering range of contemporary movements more meaningful to the observer and also to be a space where global movements speak to each other.

Pannel of speakers:  Jai Sen, Editor (School of International Development and Global Studies, Faculty of Social Science) Marie-Josée Massicotte (School of Political Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences) Nadia Abu-Zahra (School of International Development and Global Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences) Lee Cormie (Toronto School of Theology) André Drainville (Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Université Laval)